Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Fiction Review: Virginia Woolf, "A Haunted House"

This review has been moved to the R. S. Martin website. Click here to read.

7 comments:

Ron said...

Nice piece. I just read "A Haunted House" for first time after a reference to it in the new book "Important Artifacts and Personal Property of Lenore Doolan ..." After giving it a straightforward read, I Googled some analysis of the story -- yours worked nicely on the personal level and the literary level.

Flo said...

What a wonderful interpretation of Virginia Woolf. I am reading her work in sequence and I'm only just at The Voyage Out but I am enjoying reading her style and watching it develop. I'm hoping it will ease me in to her more challenging work

La foudre said...

Maybe a little bit late...I'm studying Virginia Woolf's works and I was looking for a new interpretation and I think this is one of the best I've ever read. I really enjoy this piece. But what about Virginia Woolf's Essays?

Aishani said...

We have been studying Woolf's essays and short stories for a course in English Literature and 'A Haunted House happened to be one of the first pieces that we were introduced to. We spent several classes puzzling over the meanings: implicit and explicit, and tried to piece together this fragment of a short story. However, your reading of this story has been particularly helpful since it settled the issue of diverse and conflicting perspectives as well as elucidate the working of the story. I have got to admit that the fragmentary appeal was a strong one, but being suddenly exposed to the intricacies that bind them together is not bad either.

John said...

"Woolf carries the reader along by defining everywhere "here" both is and is not"

Huh?

Robert Stanley Martin said...

John--

Please reread the second half of the sentence, as well as the rest of the paragraph. To paraphrase, the ghostly couple find "here" in the specific locations, but the narrator cannot find "here" in those places. She doesn't realize what the ghostly couple means by "here" until the story's end.

Anonymous said...

Robert, I think you are going down the right path with your Analysis but, ultimately, I think that this story is about Virgina letting ghosts inhabit her body and take part in her physical sensations. That is why their treasure is the "light in her heart".